Match against Switzerland: How to hurt Germany

Match against Switzerland: How to hurt Germany

Contents

Read on one page Contents

Page 1This is how you can hurt Germany

Page 2Three insights

Immediately after kick-off, it was clear that this game was going to be uncomfortable for the German team. After a few seconds, two Swiss players sprinted towards Jonathan Tah, who, under pressure, played the ball back to left-back Maximilian Mittelstädt. Things got tight for him. A Swiss player attacked him too impetuously, and Mittelstädt was fouled after 19 seconds.

Things went well for the Germans, but that already showed how Switzerland would approach this last group match. More offensively than their previous opponents Hungary and especially Scotland. The Swiss offensive players disrupted the German build-up play early on, sometimes in a rough manner if necessary. Like when Dan Ndoye scored the opening goal in the 28th minute, Jamal Musiala lost the ball in midfield. Robert Andrich, Joshua Kimmich and Antonio Rüdiger could no longer keep up.

In the 1:1 draw, Switzerland showed how it can be done against this German national team. How it can cause them big problems.

The plan seemed to have been found

In the first two group matches, it looked as if the national coach had found the right plan for the tournament. Andrich cleared the defensive midfield alongside Toni Kroos, around whom everything in the build-up play revolved. Kroos’ through balls went to the trio Florian Wirtz, İlkay Gündoğan and Musiala. The two young artists dribbled through the opposing defences until they were eventually cracked. Football Germany was hoping for a Wusiala tournament. And Gündoğan rarely played for the national team, set up goals and posed a threat to the goal with his own finishes.

There were occasional hiccups in the German attack, but generally it worked. Against Switzerland, on the other hand, it rarely worked. On paper, it looked like a dominant game, with significantly more possession (62:38), corners (9:2) and shots on goal (19:4). On the pitch, however, the statistical dominance hardly led to any danger, and possession did not lead to any major scoring opportunities.

Musiala and Witz often got stuck in the Swiss defense with their dribbling; it was just too tight. Havertz and Gündoğan finished without conviction. Kimmich’s attempts to cross remained attempts. And even Toni Kroos made eight bad passes, with a mundane success rate of 92 percent. When asked about his difficulties, Kroos said on ARD: “The teams are logically prepared for us.” It is clear, “they also watch our games.”

The upcoming opponents will certainly be watching the DFB team’s game against Switzerland closely. So what can opponents learn from the Swiss national team?

Immediately after kick-off, it was clear that this game was going to be uncomfortable for the German team. After a few seconds, two Swiss players sprinted towards Jonathan Tah, who, under pressure, played the ball back to left-back Maximilian Mittelstädt. It was getting tight for him. A Swiss player attacked him too impetuously, and Mittelstädt was fouled after 19 seconds.

Things went well for the Germans, but that already showed how Switzerland would approach this last group match. More offensively than their previous opponents Hungary and especially Scotland. The Swiss offensive players disrupted the German build-up play early on, sometimes in a rough manner if necessary. Like when Dan Ndoye scored the opening goal in the 28th minute, Jamal Musiala lost the ball in midfield. Robert Andrich, Joshua Kimmich and Antonio Rüdiger could no longer keep up.

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