European Football Championship: The Nose of the Nation

European Football Championship: The Nose of the Nation

Every match day morning we look back at the past and the coming European Championship, give lessons in European football clichés and let a colleague from abroad take a look at this country. You will also receive these texts as “The Summer Mail” by email in the morning if you subscribe to our “What now?” newsletter here.

The scene of the previous day

The fifth own goal of this European Championship. If a certain “Mr. Own Goal” were a single player, he would be the top scorer by a long way. What is going on at this European Championship, is everyone nervous? The latest own goal was scored, or rather stumbled over, by Italy’s defender Riccardo Calafiori in the 0:1 defeat against Spain. Bitter because it decided the game. In the end, however, it was somehow, um, inevitable. One of the almost 20 Spanish shots on goal just had to go in. Spain were so superior that my colleague Fabian Scheler wrote of the lowest 1:0 of ​​all time.

The other results:

Slovenia – Serbia 1:1
Denmark – England 1:1

The game of the day

France against the Netherlands (9 p.m., ARD). Another game that is actually far too good for a preliminary round. But we don’t want to complain. On paper and at the cheese counter, most people think France is ahead. The French have won seven of their last eight games against the Netherlands, and they also have Comté, Brie and Roquefort. The Dutch have a much more limited range: Gouda, Maasdam, Edam – and Frenkie de Jong is injured. Both teams won their first games, but were not completely convincing. Well, everyone knows that European championships are like good cheese: there is still room for improvement.

The other games:

Slovakia – Ukraine (3pm, RTL)
Poland – Austria (6 p.m., ARD)

Who will be important today?

The nose of the nation. France’s superstar Kylian Mbappé broke his nose on the shoulder of the Austrian Kevin Danso. The French press published medical bulletins and expert opinions almost every minute. There is hardly a Frenchman who doesn’t know more about the anatomy of our olfactory organs than before the tournament. What a European Championship like this can be good for. Now there is relief: France’s coach Didier Deschamps said that they would “make sure that Mbappé is available”. However, the streamlined mask in national colors that Mbappé wore during training will not be available. UEFA, true to the authority it is, only allows single-colored medical equipment.

Who else will be important?

Wout Weghorst. What is the old Dutch saying? When you think it can’t go on, a Weghorst comes along somewhere. In the first game against Poland, the man who had already annoyed Lionel Messi blasted the ball into the goal for the decisive 2:1. Two minutes after being substituted. This was of course no surprise for Weghorst himself. He had already told his girlfriend the morning before the game that if the score was tied he would come on and score a goal. That’s what he told the Dutch broadcaster NOS and wanted to show the news as proof. What did he write to her today?

Dear Germany, …

(von Marcin Wesołek, Gazeta Wyborcza, Polen)

© ZEIT ONLINE

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In Hanover, where I am living during the European Championships – like the Polish national team – the tournament is being approached with a certain distance. The fan zone, which was prepared for 5,000 spectators, was not even full for the opening game. It certainly cannot be down to the quality of the games. I was most impressed by two teams that few would have bet on beforehand: Georgia and Albania. The Polish fans have already got more than they expected: hope that the Poles can actually play football and not just kick the ball around. As for the Germans, they delivered on the pitch, especially Toni Kroos. After two games, I am already sure that this could be their next summer fairytale. Then everyone will probably forget for a while that the trains really aren’t particularly punctual.

Phrase of the day

“Judge Wellington”

(A rubber boot referee, Polish)

When a referee whistles badly, or at least in a way that the fans don’t like. The origin of the expression is said to go back to an ice hockey game in which the referee wrongly sent a Polish player off the pitch. A rubber boot is said to have been thrown from the audience. (Note from Marcin Wesołek)

Who is already European Champion?

Austria. Manuel Lugner is not just one, but the first winner of the European snow plough championships. He has not only demonstrated his driving ability, but also his sensitivity with the shovel. As his impressive final run shows, he is in no way inferior to other elite athletes in terms of elegance and precision. Perhaps Austria’s coach Ralf Rangnick could give him a call: Lugner should have time for tournaments in the summer.

What was the quote of the day?

“I love him very much.”

(Serbia coach Dragan Stojković on Luka Jović, who scored the 1-1 goal against Slovenia in the fifth minute of injury time. Ah, men.)

Every match day morning we look back at the past and the coming European Championship, give lessons in European football clichés and let a colleague from abroad take a look at this country. You will also receive these texts as “The Summer Mail” by email in the morning if you subscribe to our “What now?” newsletter here.

The fifth own goal of this European Championship. If a certain “Mr. Own Goal” were a single player, he would be the top scorer by a long way. What is going on at this European Championship, is everyone nervous? The latest own goal was scored, or rather stumbled over, by Italy’s defender Riccardo Calafiori in the 0:1 defeat against Spain. Bitter because it decided the game. In the end, however, it was somehow, um, inevitable. One of the almost 20 Spanish shots on goal just had to go in. Spain were so superior that my colleague Fabian Scheler wrote of the lowest 1:0 of ​​all time.

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