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Impact of time-of-day on judo-specific performance

  • español

    In judo tournaments, bouts in each weight category are played on the same day, and athletes competing in the final rounds must do so at different times of the day. This study aimed to investigate the effect of time of day on judo-specific performance and changes in physiological load after judo-specific effort. Fourteen male judoka (age 19.1 ± 1.4 years) voluntarily participated in the investigation. On the 1st visit, anthropometric measurements and familiarization procedures were performed, and the athletes’ chronotype was determined. The judokas performed the Special Judo Fitness Test (SJFT) during the second and third visits. They randomly performed two consecutive SJFTs with 15-min intervals at 10:00 a.m., the official start time of the matches, and at 6:00 p.m., the start time of the finals. During applications of the SJFT, the athletes’ heart rate (HR), blood lactate (bLA), body temperature, and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were monitored. The changes in the total number of projections (F1, 13 = 1.32, p = 0.27) and the SJFT index (F1, 13 = 0.30, p = 0.59) were not different between morning and afternoon. afternoon. There were similar changes in bLA (F4, 52 = 0.66, p = 0.63), RPE (F1, 13 = 1.42, p = 0.26), and body temperature (F1.4, 18.0 = 1.18 , p = 0.31), measured before and after the tests. However, HR measured at night was higher than that measured in the morning at all time points (F1, 13 = 10.28, p = 0.01), but there was no difference in the SJFT projections ( F3.8, 48.8 = 0.49, p = 0.74). In conclusion, the different times of the day did not affect the judo-specific performance or the physiological variables of the judokas.

  • English

    In judo tournaments, matches for each weight category are held on the same day and athletes competing at the finals have to compete at different times of the day. This study aimed to investigate the effect of time-of-day on judo specific performance and the changes in physiological load following judo specific performance. Fourteen male judo athletes (age 19.1±1.4 years) voluntarily participated in the study. At the 1st visit, anthropometrical measurements and familiarization procedures were conducted and the athletes’ chronotype was determined. Athletes performed the Special Judo Fitness Test (SJFT) during 2nd and 3rd visits. Athletes randomly performed two consecutive SJFTs with 15 min intervals at 10:00h, which is the official start time of matches, and at 18:00h which is the time when the finals start. During SJFT applications, athletes heart rate (HR), blood lactate (bLA), body temperature and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were monitored. The changes in total throw numbers (F1, 13= 1.32, p=0.27) and SJFT index (F1, 13= 0.30, p=0.59) were not different between morning and evening. There were similar changes in bLA (F4, 52=0.66, p=0.63), RPE (F1, 13=1.42, p=0.26) and body temperature (F1.4, 18.0=1.18, p=0.31) which were measured before and after the tests. However, HR measured in the evening were higher compared to morning measurement at all measurement times (F1, 13=10.28, p=0.01), but there was no difference in SJFT throws (F3.8, 48.8=0.49, p=0.74). In conclusion, different times of the day did not affect judo specific performance as well as physiological variables in judo athletes.

  • Portuguese

    In judo tournaments, the fights of each weight category are held on the same day, and athletes competing in the finals must do so at different times of the day. This study aimed to investigate the effect of time of day on specific judo performance and changes in physiological load after performing specific judo performance. Fourteen male judokas (age 19.1 ± 1.4 years) voluntarily participated in the study. On the first visit, anthropometric measurements and familiarization procedures were performed, and the athletes’ chronotype was determined. The judoka performed the Special Judo Fitness Test (SJFT) during the second and third visit. They randomly performed two consecutive SJFTs with 15-minute breaks at 10:00 am, official match start time, and 6:00 pm, finals start time. During the SJFT applications, the athletes’ heart rate (HR), blood lactate (bLA), body temperature and perceived exertion rate (RPE) were monitored. Changes in the total number of projections (F1, 13 = 1.32, p = 0.27) and in the SJFT index (F1, 13 = 0.30, p = 0.59) were not different between morning and afternoon . There were similar changes in bLA (F4, 52 = 0.66, p = 0.63), RPE (F1, 13 = 1.42, p = 0.26) and body temperature (F1.4, 18.0 = 1, 18, p = 0.31), measured before and after the tests. However, the HR measured at night was higher than that measured in the morning at all times (F1, 13 = 10.28, p = 0.01), but there was no difference in the projections performed in the SJFT (F3.8, 48.8 = 0.49, p = 0.74). In conclusion, the different times of day did not affect the specific judo performance or the physiological variables of the judoka.

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