Super Rugby: Ex-Box's trainer Jake White says the crusaders tactics due to rule changes

Super Rugby: Ex-Box's trainer Jake White says the crusaders tactics due to rule changes

Former Springbok coach Jake White said the Crusader's abrasive victory in the Super Rugby final reminded him of the 2007 World Cup final in Paris.

When the Springboks beat England 15-6 in the final of the tournament in France 12 years ago, both sides relied on goalkeepers to send points in what was probably the most unflattering finals in the World Cup history.

Crusader captain Sam Whitelock and his teammates make up the Super Rugby trophy after beating Jaguares 19-3 last weekend.

PHIL WALTER / GETTY IMAGES

Crusader captain Sam Whitelock and his teammates make up the Super Rugby trophy after beating Jaguares 19-3 last weekend.

Last weekend, the Crusaders scored only one attempt – for hooker Codie Taylor – to beat Jaguares 19-3 in Christchurch, thus claiming the club's 10th Super Rugby title.

Jake wrote a column for All Out Rugby website to explain why the crusaders chose to change tactics and start peering their opponents with box kicks from their halfbacks.

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"In the first 20 minutes of the Super Rugby final, the Crusaders were completely basketed by Jaguar's line speed, and the kiwis reversed the ball," White wrote.

"Then there was a water break at the end of the first quarter, and the Crusaders came together for a holding hall. From that moment there was a certain change of tactics. Instead of being hammered with the ball in hand, the Crusaders decided to kick as they were between the 10 meter long lines, and this was where they got their attack bullet – from Jaguar's knock-ons or punishment, or they won it in the air. "

South Africa's captain John Smit, left, holds the Webb Ellis Cup with coach Jake White after the Rugby World Cup final in England in 2007.

AP

South Africa's captain John Smit, left, holds the Webb Ellis Cup with coach Jake White after the Rugby World Cup final in England in 2007.

White observed that the Crusaders – like Springbok did in Paris in 2007 – won by kicking possession away and therefore ended the ball with less possession and territory.

"It reminded me of the 2007 Rugby World Cup," White noted. "In the last eight games in the tournament (the four quarter finals, the two semis, the third place and the finals), the team that had less ball won seven out of eight matches.

"As was the case in 1995, South Africa won in a final where no scores were scored, and here we are 12 years later in a contest that relies on trials and only one attempt was scored in the final of the team that had less ball. "

White also wrote that the World Cup in Japan later this year can give games of a similar nature – teams will be happy to play without the ball.

He continued to write that if rugby wants to become more into a possession-based game, it is important to reward the team that holds the ball in their hands by making it easier for them to enter the test scores.

"With this in mind, I think it's great that World Rugby is considering implementing the 50/22 rule," White wrote.

"Based on a similar law in the Rugby League, the 50/2 rule will allocate a lineout to the kick team if they successfully kick off their own half and the ball rolls in touch inside their opponent's 22."

White believes the threat of admitting an attacked lineout would motivate the defending team to deploy "goalkeepers" on both sides of the court to ensure that 50/22 kicks are covered.

It would destroy the defensive line and mean that the attacking team should have a great numerical advantage and be encouraged to exploit it through their attacks.

"The fans moan when their team" kicks the ball away ", but a team could get possession and territory with 50/22 kicks," he said.

White said rugby was a possession-based game and teams had to be rewarded for holding the ball.

He also suggested that the laws be amended to allow the receiving team to mark a kick launched from their opponent's half for a free kick anywhere on the opponent's 10m line. This is to get opponents to think twice before kicking the ball away.

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