Polish Sports Minister Witold Banka appointed as future President of World Anti-Doping Agency

Polish Sports Minister Witold Banka appointed as future President of World Anti-Doping Agency

From the Polish Conservative government, Witold Banka will succeed Britain's Craig Reedie, elected in 2014 from the ranks of the Olympic movement.

The World with AFP Posted today at 20h26

Time to Reading 1 min.

Witold Banka, May 14 in Montreal.
Witold Banka, May 14 in Montreal. SEBASTIEN ST-JEAN / AFP

Polish sports minister Witold Banka, a 34-year-old former athlete, was chosen by state representatives from the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) in Montreal on Tuesday (14 May) to become the next president of the body. announced the member states in a statement.

This choice is yet to be endorsed by a WADA Foundation Board on 7 November in Katowice. From the Polish Conservative government, Witold Banka will succeed Britain's Craig Reedie, elected in 2014 from the ranks of the Olympic movement. Since its birth in 1999, WADA has been subject to a rotation principle of its presidency between the Olympic movement (IOC and international federations) and governments.

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Representing the European continent, Witold Banka competed with Dominican Marcos Diaz, a former 44-year-old free-swimming swimmer, vice-minister of sports in his country, and a candidate on the American continent. Mr Banka was appointed by a Council of Europe Council vote to represent his continent in January, with 28 votes against 16 for former Norwegian Minister Linda Helleland.

A strengthened investigation service

WADA, which has been responsible for regulating and enforcing anti-doping throughout the world, has been severely shaken by the institutional doping scandal in Russia since the end of 2014, which highlighted the flaws in its surveillance. Since then, the agency has reformed, strengthening its investigation service and adopting an arsenal of sanctions that will allow it, in the future, to block the route of the Olympic Games (OJ) to a cheating country, that she could not do against Russia at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio.

Last September, WADA's decision to reinstate Russia as a country in line with the World Anti-Doping Code was also hotly contested, with several players seeing it as a weakness to Moscow and the International Olympic Committee ( IOC).

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